100 Deeds

In response to the Women’s Social Political Union slogan ‘Deeds Not Words’ we invited the public to do and share deeds which were exhibited at People’s History Museum and The Museum of London.

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100 Deeds interactive exhibition

In response to the Women’s Social Political Union slogan ‘Deeds Not Words’ we invited 100 members of the public to do and share deeds for gender equality.

In 2013 it was a 100 years (4th June 1913) since Emily Wilding Davison stepped in front of the King’s horse at the Epsom Derby, whilst promoting women’s right to vote.  Some considered her to be an extremist, others a hero.  On the 100 year anniversary of Emily’s deed at Epsom, we launched 100 Deeds to explore what gender equality means today.

In response to the Women’s Social Political Union slogan ‘Deeds Not Words’ we invited 100 members of the public to do and share a deed.  We are pleased to say that we exceeded our target! In June 2013 the original deeds were featured in People’s History Museum, as part of Wonder Women: Radical Manchester Wilding Festival with ‘Soundcastle’ London, and exhibited at The Museum of London.

100 Deeds was created in collaboration with our brilliant friend, artist and producer Jenny Gaskell.

100 Deeds was featured on BBC Radio 4’s Women’s Hour, The Telegraph and BBC News and attracted contributions from: Bryony Kimmings, Louise Orwin, No More Page 3, Everyday Sexism, Let Toys Be Toys and Bare Reality.

100 Deeds is an ongoing project, watch this space for exciting updates. For more details see: 100deeds.co.uk

This project would not have been possible without the generous support of the Equity Foundation, People’s History Museum and Wonder Women.

Emily Wilding Davison

At the time, the iconic act made a bold statement to the country about the dedication of the Suffragette’s conviction; it also held weight that certain Suffragette members were radical enough to sacrifice their lives, and the lives of others, to promote their cause. As a result of her actions the horse died and the jockey involved committed suicide afterwards.

If you would like to know more about the Suffragette movement or Emily Wilding Davison’s story visit our friends: Feminist Webs and The Pankhurst Centre

The video below is at Tattenham Corner. You can see Emily stepping out onto the racetrack and being struck by Anmer the horse. Please note that this is all visible in the video and that you should only watch this video if you feel you can. 

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